Issue 2, 2018

5 Reasons to choose Natural Gas Vehicles (NGV)

  1. Dollar for dollar, NGVs are the best options. It costs a lot less to reduce NOx using natural gas than any other fuel. For example, when comparing the cost of NOx reduction, natural gas transit buses are 49 per cent more cost effective than diesel and 52 per cent more cost effective than electric.
  2. New NGV engines are cleaner. The Cummins Westport ultra-low NOx engine is 90 per cent cleaner than the latest available diesel engine and beats electric motors based on the full fuel-cycle comparison.
  3. They offer low operating costs. Competitive fuel cost and low maintenance bring quick payback. And natural gas costs remain stable – an important factor for fleet operators.
  4. It’s proven technology. Once limited to return-to-base vehicles, natural gas is powering long-haul trucks. Around the world, more than 23 million NGVs are in use.
  5. Shhhh! NGVs are up to three timesquieter than diesels, something that can make a big difference on busy urban streets.

Source – American Gas Association, American Gas Magazine, August/September 2017

Connecting communities: Ontario

Launched in January 2017, the Natural Gas Grant Program will invest approximately $100 million to support projects in northern, rural and First Nation communities. The investment will help more people across Ontario connect to natural gas and significantly lower their heating costs. The supported projects are expected to result in over 11,300 homes and businesses being connected, including in six First Nations communities.

Source, Ontario Ministry on Infrastructure – https://news.ontario.ca/moi/en/2018/04/ontario-lowering-heating-costs-by-expanding-access-to-natural-gas.html

 

Natural Gas Access for Northern Mining Operation: Will modify an existing natural gas station and construct a new distribution pipeline as well as a customer metering station to connect the Taylor Mine site of Kirkland Lake Gold.

North Shore and Peninsula Roads: Will construct a natural gas pipeline to connect homes and businesses located within the City of North Bay.

Saugeen First Nation: Will construct a natural gas pipeline to connect homes and businesses located in the Chippewa Hill community of Saugeen First Nation.

South Bruce: The project will construct a natural gas pipeline to connect homes and businesses in the municipalities of Arran-Elderslie and Kincardine as well as the Township of Huron-Kinloss.

Moraviantown First Nation: Road/Corn Plant Road near Chatham-Kent, serving the Delaware Nation of Moravian Indian Reserve No. 47.

Chippewas of the Thames First Nation: Will construct a natural gas pipeline to connect homes and businesses within the Chippewa of the Thames First Nation Reserve.

Chatham-Kent Rural Pipeline Expansion: Will construct two transmission pipelines as well as supporting distribution mains and individual customer stations to immediately connect five local agricultural businesses, while establishing infrastructure that can help to meet growing energy demand within the local agri-food cluster.

Scugog Island: Will construct a reinforcement and distribution pipeline to connect homes and businesses located on Scugog Island.

Hiawatha First Nation: Will construct a natural gas distribution pipeline to connect homes and businesses located within the Hiawatha First Nation and adjoining areas of the Township of Otonabee-South Monaghan.

Fenelon Falls: Will construct a reinforcement and distribution pipeline to connect homes and business, including one large industrial customer, within the Village of Fenelon Falls, located in the City of Kawartha Lakes.

Cornwall Island: Will construct a natural gas transfer station and distribution pipeline to connect homes and businesses located on Cornwall Island.